Tuesday, November 01, 2005

Soya milk and beer, the perfect combination



I have always loved the skin on boiled milk. I remember praying as a child that my mum would slightly overboil the milk and I would get a thick leathery skin on my hot chocolate. It was a bit like eating the burned bits at the side of the macaroni cheese dish.

Anyway, I have found the ultimate drinking food. It is called "yuba" and for someone who loves milk skin it is God's own cuisine. Basically, you put a load of Soya Milk (must not be preboiled, so most of the stuff in the West will not work; although you could make you own milk by soaking soya beans). You heat it up in a fondue type thing at the table. A thin film of what is basically the most delicate and soft tofu in the world develops and you just dive in with your chopsticks and eat it.

The evenings are getting cold here and it was a warming and sociable dish to have with a beer. The particular beer in question was this wonderfully simply named brand:



The name is simply: "This is the beer".

10 comments:

rockstar said...

Yuk! I would do anything, I mean anything, to avoid even a speck of milk skin....makes me shivver the thought of it.

Pete said...

Urgh! First anpan, now this. At least doburoku has a kick to it. Judging by your tastes, you're lucky to be living in the land of crazy texture food.

The beer sounds okay, though.

AY said...

I actually think Yuba is quite different from milk skin, but obviously kuri has got a different idea... But really, it is actually lovely. I prefer it with sake, though.

rockstar said...

That sounds better!!

doltrane said...

I should watch that rockstar! I'll go for it with either accompaniment- or both!!

nils said...

「これがビールだ」is a pretty funny name. Where is it from? Yuba, BTW, is good old-fashioned Kyoto down home cooking. I have some pictures of it being made at a famous shop. Here and here.

buyo said...

It came from the local convenience store. I have thrown out the bottles so I don't know where exactly it is made.

AY said...

Yes, when you buy Yuba from a shop, it is normally dried. I love making it at home and eating it fresh, though. (And believe me, it is not at all difficult!)

buyo said...

In the interests of research, I paid another visit to the convenience store. It is made by Ginga Kogen beer, who I think make a lot of these niche beers, and it comes from Iwate prefecture, I think.

AY said...

http://www.gingakogenbeer.com/english/index.html
The company's URL